Hymn of the Month

We are commanded to, "Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly, teaching and admonishing one another in all wisdom, singing psalms and hymns and spiritual songs." (Colossians 3:16). Accordingly, we incorporate hymns into our regular Sunday morning worship at Pacific Hope Church. We firmly believe in equipping God's people with the knowledge of His Word through sound teaching in our classes, Bible studies, and even in our Sunday morning worship. Our worship will always be with the purpose of exalting the Lord to His proper place; it is never man-centered or seeking to create an emotional experience.


Let Us Love, and Sing, and Wonder (originally titled Praise for Redeeming Love) by John Newton, is June’s Hymn of the Month. Click here to listen.


The song’s six stanzas first appeared in Newton’s Twenty Six Letters on Religious Subjects, and in Gospel Magazine in May, 1774.  It appeared later in the Olney Hymns in 1779, set to its traditional tune, All Saints (Darmstadt).


The contemporary melody was written in 2001 by Laura Taylor of Indelible Grace Music, a ministry to college students (birthed primarily through the Reformed University Fellowship (RUF)) as desire grew for the depth and richness of the hymn tradition, coupled with the music of a new generation.


Says Kevin Twit, Campus Minister, RUF at Belmont University:

“Our hope is to be a voice calling our generation back to something rich and solid and beyond fluff and the trendy. We want to remind God's people that thinking and worship are not mutually exclusive, and we want to invite the Church to appreciate her heritage without idolizing it.”



About the Author

John Newton was born in London on July 24, 1725.  As a child, his mother stored his young mind with Scripture, but this ceased on her death when he was seven years old. In his eleventh year he accompanied his father, a sea captain, on a voyage. For several years his life was one of dissipation and crime. He was flogged as a deserter from the navy, and for fifteen months lived, half-starved and ill-treated, in abject degradation under a slave-dealer in Africa. Afterwards he himself engaged in the slave trade. 


Returning to England in 1748, his vessel was nearly wrecked in a storm. This peril forced solemn reflection upon him and from that time he was a changed man. It was six years, however, before he relinquished the slave trade, which was not then regarded as an unlawful occupation. But in 1754, he gave up the sea-faring life, and holding a favorable civil position, began religious work as well. In 1764, in his thirty-ninth year, he entered upon a regular ministry as the Curate of Olney. In this position he had intimate interaction with William Cowper, and with him produced the "Olney Hymns."  In 1779, Newton became Rector of S. Mary Woolnoth, in London, in which position he became more widely known. It was here he died, Dec. 21, 1807.


He called his hymns "The fruit and expression of [his] own experience." The most characteristic are those which depict, in the language of intense humiliation, his mourning for the abiding sins of his regenerate life and the sense of the withdrawal of God's face, coincident with the never-failing conviction of acceptance in The Beloved. These themes may be seen in the speeches, writings, and diaries of his whole life. His published works are quite numerous, consisting of sermons, letters, devotional aids, and more than 250 hymns, including Amazing Grace, Glorious Things of Thee are Spoken and Behold the Throne of Grace.

 

Notes compiled from Rev. H. Leigh Bennett, M.A; and Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A. 1872 https://hymnary.org/person/Newton_John


Let Us Love and Sing and Wonder

Words by John Newton, Music by Laura Taylor

 

Let us love and sing and wonder, 

Let us praise the Savior’s Name!
He has hushed the law’s loud thunder,
He has quenched Mount Sinai’s flame.
He has washed us with His blood,
He has washed us with His blood,
He has washed us with His blood,
He has brought us nigh to God.


Let us love the Lord Who bought us,
Pitied us when enemies,
Called us by His grace, and taught us,
Gave us ears and gave us eyes:
He has washed us with His blood,
He has washed us with His blood,
He has washed us with His blood,
He presents our souls to God.


Let us sing though fierce temptation
Threatens hard to bear us down!
For the Lord, our strong Salvation,
Holds in view the conqueror’s crown:
He Who washed us with His blood,
He Who washed us with His blood,
He Who washed us with His blood,
Soon will bring us home to God.


Let us wonder; grace and justice

Join and point to mercy’s store;
When through grace in Christ our trust is,
Justice smiles and asks no more:
He Who washed us with His blood,
He Who washed us with His blood,
He Who washed us with His blood,
Has secured our way to God.


Let us praise, and join the chorus
Of the saints enthroned on high;
Here they trusted Him before us,
Now their praises fill the sky:
“Thou hast washed us with Thy blood,
Thou hast washed us with Thy blood,
Thou hast washed us with Thy blood:
Thou art worthy, Lamb of God!”


Yes, we praise Thee, gracious Saviour;
Wonder, love, and bless Thy Name.
Pardon, Lord our poor endeavor
Pity, for Thou know’st our frame.
Wash our souls and songs with blood,
Wash our souls and songs with blood,
Wash our souls and songs with blood,
For by Thee, we come to God.